Read The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri (Dante's Divine Comedy) by Oscar (editor) Kuhns Online

Title : The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri (Dante's Divine Comedy)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B005FO0MWM
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Language : English
Publisher : Thomas Y Crowell Co 1897
Number of Pages : 298 Pages
File Size : 696 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri (Dante's Divine Comedy) Reviews

  • DA
    2018-11-24 18:11

    While this translation by Longfellow is reminiscent of the Douay-Rheims Bible (Latin to sometimes mannered, even stilted English), this edition is splendidly bound and illustrated with the classic drawings on THE DIVINE COMEDY by Gustave Dore. The cover is red linen hardcover embellished with gold titles and a large black "engraved" Dore drawing. The book is oversized and comes in a superb box "book sleeve" for protection and display. Any informed and educated Catholic must read (at least once) and keep a copy of THE DIVINE COMEDY, but so should any informed and literate person. There are other translations that I prefer to this one by Longfellow (i.e., Mark Musa's in the Penguin edition also available on Amazon). However, this is one I will keep on my shelf for its beauty as an example of the book art alone.

  • Er Jwee Chiek
    2018-12-09 22:01

    Excellent translation with superb commentary. Dante Alighieri’s triology is undoubtedly the giant amongst giants in the world of classic literature and an important adjunct to the bible. The bible, while alluding to the afterlife that continues in eternity, does not focus on the places a soul can reside in the after life. Three places, namely hell, purgatory and paradise, are where souls will check in, depending on whether they are God's elect and the sins one has committed. It is clear that if one is God's elect, he could reside in either purgatory, a temporary holding ground based on the sin records, or paradise where God's chosen will end up for eternity serving and praising Him ceaselessly. If one is not amongst the chosen, hell is the only destination. But hell has nine levels. *The unchosen will go to one of the nine levels depending on one's predominant sin. The worst sin in Dante's definition was betrayal and we find the unfortunate Judas Ischariot in the company of Satan on the deepest coldest level of hell.

  • Donna Boynton
    2018-11-20 17:01

    Excellent publication. The print was clear and the illustrations spectacular. Gustave Dore's wood engravings stood out against the white paper. I think his illustrations are the best available for The Divine Comedy. A quick summary before each Canto was very helpful. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's translation to English was very poetic. A nice edition protected in a beautiful case.

  • Amazon Customer
    2018-12-05 19:09

    Divine Comedy, especially in its earlier versions is one of the most remarkable books written by man. This translation of it is perhaps the best in English. I first read this work three decades ago, and reading it now is as refreshing as ever.

  • zanyone02
    2018-12-05 21:08

    I wanted to read this for a while. Before I bought it though I looked at a lot of copies, even free. A lot of reviews said that this translation by John Ciardi was one of the best. I found it easier to read than the free version I had also downloaded. It also has notes inside of it that helps to explain some of the things that happening in case you get confused. I really appreciated John Ciardi's beginning section, "How to read Dante", in the book. It helped me to catch on to things quicker. I also liked that Ciardi explained his translation process. It made it easier to read in a way. I have not made it through all of it, but I have enjoyed all that I have read. I have also understood it. For comparison, I could not follow the other versions I downloaded. Their Cantos were in paragraphs and sometimes the wording made no sense. Overall - If you want to read The Divine Comedy... I would suggest this version translated by John Ciardi.