Read Death in Second-Century Christian Thought: The Meaning of Death in Earliest Christianity by Jeremiah Mutie Online

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Death in Second Century Christian Thought explores how the meaning of death was conceptualized in this crucial period of the history of the church Through an exploration of some key metaphors and other figures of speech that the early church used to talk about this interesting but difficult topic, the author argues that the early church selected, modified, and utilized existing views on the subject of death in order to offer a distinctively Christian view of death based on what they believed the word of God taught on the subject, particularly in light of the ongoing story of Jesus following his death his burial and resurrection In short, the book shows how Christians interacted with the views of death in late antiquity, coming up with their own distinctive view of death....

Title : Death in Second-Century Christian Thought: The Meaning of Death in Earliest Christianity
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ISBN : 1498201644
Format Type : Paperback
Language : English
Publisher : Pickwick Publications March 24, 2015
Number of Pages : 244 pages
File Size : 862 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Death in Second-Century Christian Thought: The Meaning of Death in Earliest Christianity Reviews

  • C. Marsh
    2018-10-14 03:23

    Dr. Mutie’s work is unique for several reasons. First, it explores in depth a subject that most people think is morbid. Second, it does so from a historical perspective utilizing an impressive amount of primary and secondary sources from both Western and Eastern perspectives. Third, Mutie’s research is presented from a view that is uniquely Christian without marginalizing other faiths.

  • Michael C. Boling
    2018-10-21 08:46

    Death. Scripture says it will come for us all at some point as a result of sin. The physical cessation of life is something we all know will come but tend to try and not think about. Furthermore, what happens when we die has over the years been a source of debate and discussion within the church. Outside of considerations of Catholic dogma with their assertion at various periods of time for purgatory, evangelical thought on what happens when we die centers on two main proposals, the immediate translation of the “soul” to heaven to rejoin the resurrected physical body when Jesus returns, or two similar yet slightly different approaches, namely the body remaining where it ceased activity awaiting the resurrection and the idea of an interim place for the dead other than the soul journeying to the heavens.